African Studies Cluster @ Wesleyan » Blog Archive » Update from Brodigan Award Recipient Esi Quagrainie

African Studies Cluster @ Wesleyan » Blog Archive » Update from Brodigan Award Recipient Esi Quagrainie.

Click above link for an update on Esi’s (’14) “Ghana Writing Project”.

Fall 2014 Office Hours

My office hours this fall:

Monday/Wednesday, 1:30 – 2:30  in my office (PAC 417), or by appointment.

Exceptions:

No office hours on Labor Day or Columbus Day (October 13). (But you can always make an appointment for a different day!)

Language maps of the US, include African languages

So, this is interesting. Slate has as series of interesting maps showing the most popular languages spoken in each American state. After filtering for the obvious second language (Spanish), they present a series of specialized maps, including the most popular African language in each state. Data probably is not perfect, but likely about as good as we have. “Kru, Ibo, Yoruba” seems to be most dominant (Go, Nigeria and West Africa!). After that is Amharic and Cushite. Then Swahili, Bantu, and “Nilotic” (Sudanese mostly?).

Language map: What’s the most popular language in your state?.

Professor White on the Affordable Care Act, This Thursday

Thursday, April 3, 2014

4:15 p.m.

Public Affairs Center 002

The Missing Piece
in the Affordable Care Act

Sponsored by the Government Department

Professor Joseph White

Luxenburg Family Professor of Public Policy
Case Western Reserve University

Four years after its passage, the Affordable Care Act makes no credible promise to meet the goal that most voters most desired — which was not to expand coverage to the previously uninsured, but to reduce the out-of-pocket costs of paying for health insurance. Why did the Democrats pass legislation that was not explicitly designed to reduce health insurance costs? The answers involve interest group politics, regional divisions in the Democratic Party, and the politics of the health care policy community